BLOG: Delaware Allows Public Companies to Hold Remote Shareholder Meetings

On April 6, 2020, Governor John Carney of the State of Delaware issued the Tenth Modification of the Declaration of a State of Emergency for the State of Delaware Due to a Public Health Threat (the “Declaration”). The initial declaration was issued on March 12, 2020. Among other matters relevant as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Declaration touches on a change in shareholder meetings related to publicly traded companies organized in the State of Delaware. In line with the social distancing principles adopted by all businesses, the Declaration allows the board of directors of companies that issued notices for . . . Read More

BLOG: Defense Production Act Orders for COVID-19 Related Medical Equipment

The outbreak of COVID-19 has rapidly increased demand for medical supplies and equipment such as N95 respirators, isolation gowns, isolation masks, surgical masks, eye protection, intensive care unit equipment, and diagnostic testing supplies. To address the resulting shortage, President Trump issued Executive Order 13909 on March 18, 2020, under the Defense Production Act of 1950 (DPA), authorizing the Department of Health and Human Services to prioritize orders for “health and medical resources needed to respond to the spread of COVID-19, . . . Read More

BLOG: HUBZone Program Flexibility During the COVID-19 Outbreak

In a webinar on March 25, 2020, officials with SBA’s HUBZone Program showed that SBA understands the unprecedented COVID-19 outbreak has created some unique challenges for HUBZone firms. Fortunately, SBA acted proactively to provide flexibilities to HUBZone firms that are struggling to maintain their principal office location and employees during this challenging time.  Highlights from SBA’s webinar included: The new annual recertification process will be voluntary for the remainder of 2020, except for firms that are up for a three-year . . . Read More

BLOG: JEDI Update: Pentagon Files Voluntary Motion for Remand to Reconsider Microsoft Award

On March 12, 2020, the Department of Defense (DOD) filed a motion for voluntary remand requesting that the Court of Federal Claims (COFC) remand the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) contract case for 120 days. This would allow DOD to reconsider certain aspects of its decision to award the JEDI contract to Microsoft. DOD’s re-evaluation could signify major flaws in the process. For background, in November of 2019 Amazon Web Services (AWS) filed a bid protest with the COFC protesting . . . Read More

BLOG: Employers: A Briefing on Federal Agencies’ Responses to COVID-19

Federal, state, and local governments are working around the clock to implement various measures in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis. Additionally, a number of federal agencies and departments are also taking action in response to the outbreak. For employers across the nation, it is undeniably an unstable and unclear time, with no concrete signs of when there will be a sense of normalcy again. However, in the meantime, we compiled a list of some of the agencies with brief . . . Read More

BLOG: COVID-19 and Material Adverse Effect Provisions in Acquisition Agreements

The coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to create extensive uncertainty for individuals and businesses. For parties actively pursuing an M&A transaction, COVID-19 presents the buyer and seller with additional risks both pre- and post-closing, including impacting the valuation of the target company, increasing exposure to liabilities relating to performance and payment obligations, expanding risk of claims from employees and other personnel, among other extraordinary risks that may result in delay or, in the worst cases, termination of the transaction. Traditionally, acquisition agreements include . . . Read More

BLOG: Raytheon Challenges CO Intellectual Property Decision in COFC

In a recent Court of Federal Claims (COFC) case, [1] Raytheon Corporation (Raytheon) challenged a federal agency order that a Government Purpose Right (GPR) legend be affixed to documents purportedly containing technical data. COFC held that the contracting officer’s (CO) decision that the documents contained technical data and the CO order to affix a GPR legend constituted a claim under COFC jurisdiction.This demonstrates that government contractors may challenge similar intellectual property disputes in COFC, despite an adverse final decision from a . . . Read More

BLOG: 4 Things to Know About DOJ’s Procurement Collusion Strike Force

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has been increasing scrutiny of anticompetitive conduct in public procurements over the past several years, and this trend is certain to continue in light of DOJ’s formation of a new Procurement Collusion Strike Force (PCSF), announced in November 2019. What should government contractors know about the PCSF? Here are four key takeaways regarding the PCSF’s activities to help government contractors understand and prepare for increased enforcement of antitrust laws. The PCSF is an interagency partnership across the . . . Read More

BLOG: Reselling Laptops and Tablets to the Federal Government Just Got Easier

The Small Business Administration (SBA) issued a class waiver of the non-manufacturer rule (NMR) on March 9, 2020. Effective April 8, 2020, it waives the NMR for commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) laptop and tablet computers. The waiver is great news for small business resellers in the IT industry because the waiver will make it easier for these small businesses to comply with the NMR when reselling COTS laptops and tablets to federal agencies. For some background, the NMR is an exception to . . . Read More

BLOG: “Constructive Demotion” Claim Under Title VII Gains Traction in 4th Circuit District Courts

While the viability of a claim of “constructive demotion” under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) has yet to be determined by the Fourth Circuit, a series of cases in district courts within the Circuit suggest that such might not be the case for long. In one such recent case, Judge Conrad of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Virginia denied a defendant truck driver training company’s motion to dismiss a constructive . . . Read More